Monthly Archives: March 2014

Full Moon Rising over the San Diego City Skyline

The full moon, rising at dusk over a view of downtown San Diego and its beautiful harbor front and city skyline, viewed from Point Loma, California. The building that is nicely lit in the center is the San Diego County Administration Building. I have recently made a nice series of new images of the San Diego city skyline and harbor, many featuring the rising full moon. Among them are several large, high resolution panoramas. I am posting them on my other website, Natural History Photography Blog. Cheers and thanks for looking.

Full Moon Rising over the San Diego City Skyline

Full Moon Rising over the San Diego City Skyline

Landscape Arch and Milky Way at Night, Arches National Park, Utah

I have photographed many natural arches, but Landscape Arch in Arches National Park was the most difficult. Landscape Arch is broad, with a span of over 300′ (99m), and it is seen at some distance. I visited this arch on two separate nights and waited both times until the skies cleared and the Milky Way (our galaxy) had rotated into the best alignment, before I made this photograph. I was alone here, as I was during all of my evening photographic efforts, accompanied only by the small animals in the surrounding bushes and the sounds of a slight breeze over the rocks.

Landscape Arch and Milky Way, stars rise over the arch at night.

Landscape Arch and Milky Way, stars rise over the arch at night.

Landscape Arch in Arches National Park, Utah, is considered to be the longest natural arch in the world, having a span of 290 feet (89m) . Landscape Arch is gradually falling apart, with at least three sections of the arch known to have fallen since 1991. I set out to photograph this amazing arch under the star-filled Utah sky and it turned out to be one of the most technically challenging nightscapes (nighttime landscape photos) I have made. Because the trail that formerly went under the arch is now closed (National Park lawyers know what is good for us better than we do), viewing of the arch is from several hundred feet away. That is a long distance to light at night. Furthermore, in order to use side lighting as a way of illustrating detail in the rock, I had to use remotely controlled equipment since I was working alone. After two nights of experimentation, I managed to make four keeper images, of which this is my favorite. This image was shot with the technically excellent combination of Canon 5D Mark III and Nikon 14-24 lens so it is very sharp and clean while still freezing the glorious Milky Way galaxy (the galaxy in which we live) in the sky above the arch.

Milky Way Galaxy over Arch Rock, Joshua Tree National Park, California

The Milky Way galaxy — our galaxy — arcs through the night sky over “Arch Rock” in Joshua Tree National Park. I have photographed this arch at night many times over the past several years in order to practice my light painting technique and experiment with various lenses and methods for producing high resolution stitched panoramas. These two images are a couple of my favorites. The first is the result of a single exposure, while the second is a Mercator projection of a panorama composed of 12 source images. Garry McCarthy, a shooting partner and friend of mine, originally conceived this composition — the Milky Way positioned in the night sky to echo with the shape of the arch itself — in 2010, and we have executed it many times since, always looking to improve on our results and try different lighting styles and approaches. Cheers and thanks for looking!

The Milky Way galaxy arcing over Arch Rock

The Milky Way galaxy arcing over Arch Rock

Panoramic photo of the Milky Way galaxy over Arch Rock

Panoramic photo of the Milky Way galaxy over Arch Rock

To my knowledge, this composition was original at the time we first shot it. In the intervening years I have fielded many emails from others wanting to know where it is and when to photograph it. We have always been alone while photographing the Milky Way over Arch Rock, but since it is now a draw not only for individual photographers but also for workshop groups, it is increasingly unlikely that one will experience solitude at this arch. It is not a large location and one or two photographers are about all that it can accommodate effectively.